Drama

What makes the Drama Dept special?

Creativity     Achievement     Self-development

Creativity: It is every child’s right to be given an opportunity to express themselves creatively. Creative outlets can help unlock some of the major problems that children are facing at school such as low self-esteem, lack of confidence and confusion over identity. By helping to develop a sense of worth in children through the arts, creative activities not only stimulate learning but also promote a strong awareness of self and citizenship.

Achievement: We offer them the opportunity to learn unique skills, giving them the chance to aspire to greater things. Part of personal growth is the recognition one gets for working hard, pushing back boundaries and overcoming new challenges. This gives the achiever a sense of well-being and contentment that drives them to want to do better and work even harder!

Self-development: Developing dreams and making the best of ourselves in a world that is fraught with uncertainty. A child or young person may never be aware of what inspires them unless they are given the chance to explore for themselves and identify the fact that they too can be inspired.

BE BRAVE     BE CO-OPERATIVE     BE CREATIVE     DEVELOP SELF-DISCIPLINE

Key Stage 3

Drama in Key Stage 3 is taught on a fortnightly basis.  In year 7 emphasis is put on developing a ‘kit bag’ of skills that can be used across the curriculum.  These include; developing self-confidence, improving listening and speaking skills and exercising team skills.  The main objective in year 7 is to be able to stand in front of a group of people and communicate effectively without worry and nervousness.

In year 8 the emphasis moves up in to developing specific drama skills, still building on knowledge from year 7, students are introduced to drama techniques and conventions to help create more sophisticated performances.

In year 9 prominence is put on developing skills to support a transition in to GCSE.  This includes; memorising scripts, developing knowledge of abstract drama concepts and exploring character motivation.

Drama GCSE

What will you do?

This course is mostly practical, focusing on Improvisation and Script acting, but includes keeping notes in preparation for the written exam.  The emphasis of the course is on devising, performing and evaluating.

The projects we usually follow are:

Acting – this option involves exploring, learning, rehearsing and performing a published script, in groups of 2- 7.

Improvisation – this option involves research, devising, rehearsal and performance of an original piece of theatre focusing on the Comedy genre.

Physical theatre – this option involves researching, devising, choreographing and performing an original piece of drama based on movement.

Theatre in Education – this option involves working with the local infant or junior schools to provide them with educational plays and workshops.  In the past some of the plays have been about road safety, healthy eating, anti-bullying and drugs awareness.

How will it be assessed?

Practical coursework 60% – controlled practical assessment (15% rehearsal and 45% performance)

Written examination 40% – one paper of 90 minutes in length


Frequently Asked Questions

How many lessons of Drama will I have?

Drama in KS3 (Year 7 and 8) taught on a fortnightly basis at Noadswood.

What will study in Drama in Year 7?

In Year 7 emphasis is put on developing a ‘kit bag’ of skills that can be used across the curriculum. These include; developing self-confidence, improving listening and speaking skills and exercising team skills. The main objective in year 7 is to be able to stand in front of a group of people and communicate effectively without worry and nervousness.

What will study in Drama in Year 8?

In Year 8 the emphasis moves up in to developing specific drama skills, still building on knowledge from Year 7, pupils are introduced to drama techniques and conventions to help create more sophisticated performances.

If I take Drama as an Option subject what will I study?

In Year 9 prominence is put on developing skills to support a transition in to GCSE. This includes; memorising script, developing knowledge of abstract drama concepts and exploring character motivation.

 

At KS 4- GCSE Drama

What is Drama?

Drama is about telling stories; it's about exploring characters and ideas, strange places and different times. At it's heart, Drama is about understanding more about ourselves through the lives of others.

Why Drama?

Drama can benefit everyone, from the more quiet and thoughtful pupils, who always gain in confidence to those pupils that like to be the centre of attention, who often develop a better sense of what it means to work as a team.

Which skills do you need for GCSE Drama?

Success in Drama begins with a real interest in acting and the theatre. Also, you need to be a considerate listener and responsive in your dealings with others.


Synopsis of Study

Year 7 – Drama

Autumn

Students will learn all the basic skills and conventions of drama through a variety of topics and resources. In the Autumn Term work will centre on Storytelling, movement, mime and physicality through exploration of texts by Roald Dahl

 

Spring

Students will learn all the basic skills and conventions of drama through a variety of topics and resources. In Spring Term characterisation skills and performance confidence will be developed though exploration of Voice as a tool, tone pause pace pitch volume and accent.

 

Summer

Students will learn all the basic skills and conventions of drama through a variety of topics and resources. By the Summer Term students will be able to combine these key skills and utilise them when working on improvisations, devised work and script based around the Jabberwocky by Lewis Carrol.

 

 

Year 8 – Drama

Autumn

Now that students have the basic toolkit of drama they will move on to develop these skills to a more detailed level and explore more advanced conventions and styles. In Autumn Term work focusses on exploring spontaneous and rehearsed improvisation through the intention of creating Tension.

 

Spring

Now that students have the basic toolkit of drama they will move on to develop these skills to a more detailed level and explore more advanced conventions and styles. In Spring Term students will spend time understanding new performance strategies to explore how Dramatic irony is created, leading on to deepening their knowledge then applying it to their devised work.

 

Summer

In Summer Term students will spend time understanding new performance strategies to explore how Dramatic irony is created, leading on to deepening their knowledge then applying it to their devised work. The aim is that by the end of Year 8 students can not only apply the skills but understand why they have selected certain strategies and what their purpose is. Students should also have developed confidence in order to create work themselves and offer personal ideas and opinions.

 

 

Year 9 – Drama

Autumn

The emphasis in Year 9 is on starting to practise and develop GCSE skills. In Autumn Term students develop their understanding on how to create, rehearse, analyse and evaluate performances. They will be asked to devise their own developed piece of theatre, which links directly to the first component 1 of AQA GCSE Drama and Section C in the written exam.

 

Spring

During Spring Term students will explore how to learn, rehearse and direct the play texts through practical drama (this also transitions nicely into GCSE component 2 work).

 

Summer

During Summer Term students will explore how to learn, rehearse and direct the play texts through practical drama (this also transitions nicely into GCSE component 2 work).

 

 

Year 10 – Drama

Autumn

We begin with Component 2 Devising, this part of the GCSE Drama course is worth 40% of the final grade and is divided into two parts; Performance and Written log book. Students are given three starting points typically a photo, a poem/song and a script extract, from these stimuli they develop ideas for a practical piece of drama; research, receive feedback, devise, rehearse and perform. The logbook is completed at intervals during the creative process.

 

Spring

In Drama, focus shifts to preparation for Component 1, the written exam (also worth 40 %.) We look at Section C – Analysis and evaluation of a performance. Students study the performance text; watch a live recorded performance; make notes and construct a response ready for their mock exams.

 

Summer

In Drama, in the Summer Term, we will begin studying the chosen set text - The Crucible by Arthur Miller.

 

 

Year 11 – Drama

Autumn

We continue studying The Crucible; designing set and costume; understanding Miller’s intentions for the play finding characters’ motivation and exploring how the actors uses their skills to create effects for the audience. This is all preparation for Section B of the written exam.

 

Spring

In Drama, the final term looks at Component 3- Text in performance (worth 20%), students will be given a script to research, learn, rehearse and perform. These performance will be submitted to an AQA examiner.