History

Key Stage 3

The main concept running through our units of study in KS3 is ‘Democracy.’ We explore the importance of democracy from the medieval period up to the twentieth century, through a series of engaging lessons. We refer back to the ‘Big Picture of Democracy’ and ‘Thinking Talk Lessons’ at the end of each term, in order to consolidate and consider the effects of democracy within each study.

During year 7 students begin the autumn term with a focus on local history covering topics from Medieval Southampton through to World War II and Hampshire. Students then move on to investigate England from 1066-1500 with our topic area entitled “Blood, Guts and Gore.” In the spring term we look at “Monstrous Monarchs” a unit on both Tudor and Stuart England. Over the summer term we move our investigations onto Empire; by focusing on the “Impact of Tea;” with our global study on the British Empire, before finally turning our attention towards the impact of the Industrial Revolution on Great Britain.

Year 8 students explore a combination of thematic, period studies, and wider world studies these include the thematic study of Crime & Punishment. In autumn term two we investigate Power and Politics in Great Britain to ensure students have good knowledge of political change and emancipation from 1700 onwards. Students then move on to consider the Great War, Inter-War Year events, the rise of Nazi Germany, World War Two and post war Britain.

Key Stage 4

Why choose History?

There are many reasons to consider studying History at GCSE. It is recognised as a demanding course which requires young people to work collaboratively and independently. Students will be expected to be able to recollect comprehensive historical information through a knowledge rich curriculum which also emphases good writing skills, analytical thinking, source evaluation and an ability to share opinions. These attributes give colleges and employers a clear message about a person’s willingness to push their ability and have high expectations with their learning. GCSE History requires investigative responses from a breadth of evidence; this skill transfers to a multitude of studies, and therefore this and other essential historical skills can assist with learning across the curriculum. History also teaches you about the world you live in; as well as the events that shaped it and us; locally, nationally and internationally.

The GCSE History AQA content comprises the following elements:

  • One period study – Germany, 1890–1945: Democracy and Dictatorship – Exam end Y11
  • One thematic study – Britain: Health and the People: c1000 to the present day – Exam end Y11
  • One wider world depth study – Conflict and Tension Korean and Vietnam Wars – Exam end Y11
  • One British depth study including the historic environment – Elizabethan England – Exam end Y11
  • Cold War Conflict 1945-1974 in the Autumn term of year 9 to prepare for GCSE – Not examined

We pride ourselves on an engaging and enquiry based approach to learning within History at Noadswood.


Frequently Asked Questions

What is so amazing about History?

Our history course has been designed to challenge young minds and promote deep thinking for all learners. Our investigations into ‘BIG’ stories and Individual histories allow students to immerse themselves in local, national and international accounts of the past.

“A people without the knowledge of their past history,

origin and culture is like a tree without roots”.

Marcus Garvey

What do we do well?

We are all passionate about our subject, we continue throughout our careers to look at our own learning journeys and consider new ideas, initiatives and methodologies to ensure learning remains consistently high. The Department is driven by a desire to stretch young minds, and is committed to creating enthusiasm for history with our pupils.

Why do students enjoy History so much?

We are proud of our continued efforts to create exciting, thought provoking lessons. As such we hope we have endeavoured to create a syllabus that engages, motivates, questions, provokes debate, and ultimately inspires our young historians to have a thirst for more historical knowledge.

What support is offered?

Alongside consistent classroom support, with provision to engage with the subject and ensure good understanding of historical literacy we also offer catch up sessions for all students who may struggle, or have fallen behind due to absence.

How rich is the curriculum?

Our schemes of work have been designed to engage and inspire the young people we teach and we believe they offer depth, and breadth of knowledge on a wide range of fascinating aspects of our local, national and international histories. Each topic area within our scheme of work has been researched, and expert knowledge brought in where we could. Historian’s views within interpretations, social diversity and democracy of views for the peoples investigated have tried to be as inclusive as possible.

What we are proud of?

  • The knowledge and expertise of the teachers who are responsible for your child
  • Continued efforts to research, expand thinking and consider new innovative ways of teaching
  • Our rich and diverse curriculum which has been planned meticulously
  • Our efforts to ensure we follow on from foundation history at KS2. In consultation with local primary schools in three yearly meetings for history we have sought an understanding of student’s prior history learning from KS2 in order to build on this.

Which courses do we offer at Noadswood?

At KS4 AQA History including 1000C History of medicine, Elizabeth I, Conflict and Tension in Asia, Germany 1890-1945.

At KS3 – we begin with local history, and then we teach from 1066 up to and including histories into the 20thcentury

What do students achieve?

We are really proud of our outcomes within history, we have good uptake at GCSE because students thoroughly enjoy their studies within history

What does history look like in Year 7?

We start with an investigation into local histories ranging from Anglo-Saxon Hamwic up to Beaulieu and the SOE in World War Two, culminating with an investigation into the SeaCity Museum in Southampton

When does GCSE begin?

Pupils can opt for History at the end of year 8 and studies begin in Y9. For the first term, we start students on a non-examined course investigating the Cold War. This unit is pivotal for helping our students appreciate both the Conflict and Tension in Asia, and Germany 1890-1945 examined units. This study also enables us to ensure students taking history get to grips with the demands of a history course at GCSE for example by looking at skills and examination technique.

What is the timetable allocation for History in KS3/4?

In year 7 and year 8 students do 4 hours a fortnight. In year 9 pupils start their GCSE options and are able to opt for History. They have 6 hours per fortnight of lesson time.

How is History delivered in year 7?

Via expertly produced school resources, supplemented by other resources including PowerPoints, games, DVDs, and artefacts

Why is History important?

Learning History enhances students’ own and their new historical skills, future employment prospects, as well as problem solving and communication skills, which are essential in every walk of life. Overall the impact we want to have shared with history students at Noadswood is as advocated by Christine Counsell ‘A distinctive quest for truth.’ As such we hope we have endeavoured to create a syllabus that engages, motivates, questions, provokes debate, and ultimately inspires our young historians to have a thirst for more historical knowledge.

“My child struggled with History in primary. How will you help?”

We offer lots of support in class, and catch up with one to one support following absence (if required). We ensure we follow on from foundation history at KS2. In consultation with local primary schools in three yearly meetings for history we have sought an understanding of student’s prior history learning from KS2 in order to build on this.

Will my child enjoy History?

100% at Noadswood.